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Francis heading to Savannah State after impressive workout

Eastside’s Treyvon Francis (bottom center) recently inked to play basketball at Savannah State Univeristy. Joining him on his big day, sitting from left, are his mother Marlene Kitchens and fellow basketball player Anthony Henderson. In the back are, from left, Eastside athletic director Dr. Bruce McCollumn, head coach Gregory Freeman and Eastside principal Jeff Cher. (Staff photo: Manny Fils).

Eastside’s Treyvon Francis (bottom center) recently inked to play basketball at Savannah State Univeristy. Joining him on his big day, sitting from left, are his mother Marlene Kitchens and fellow basketball player Anthony Henderson. In the back are, from left, Eastside athletic director Dr. Bruce McCollumn, head coach Gregory Freeman and Eastside principal Jeff Cher. (Staff photo: Manny Fils).

COVINGTON — Eastside’s Treyvon Francis turned a lot of heads at his workout at Savannah State University.

One of those heads included Tigers head coach Horace Broadnax, who was part of the 1984 Georgetown Hoyas national championship team. After seeing what Francis could do, the Tigers offered Francis a new home.

“The coach at Savannah State said his workout, the coach played at Georgetown University, was on of the best workouts they’d seen in his tenure there. That says a lot for (Eastside),” Eagles head coach Gregory Freeman said. “What we did everyday and what we did before coming here really set the tone for this program. This (Francis signing) could be the younger guys if they follow the script of doing what they’re suppose to in the classroom, at home and at practice. All three of those things have to take place.”

Francis leaves Eastside having scored more than 1,000 points and 500 assist for his career. During his senior year, he scored 403 points making 66 percent of his field goals (83-of-125), 60 percent from 3-point range (34-of-57) and 80 percent of his free throws (100-of-125).

Beside being chosen Region 8-AAAA Player of the Year, Francis also played an integral role in putting the Eagles to the last two region championship games and sending ending up in the state playoffs for the past three seasons.

“For those that have been in this basketball program for the last three years, you know the struggles. We really built it from the ground up and Treyvon was symbolic of everything we’ve gone through to get not only local, but state status,” Freeman said.

“He was named to the all-state team and he leaves here with not only a legacy of basketball, but of winning basketball and how to play basketball the right way. He plays unselfishly, we was a great teammate and he turned into a pretty good leader.”