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Covington Police Chief names 5-year-old honorary officer

Barron and Tangi Steward are proud parents of 5-year-old Morgan Steward, who always dreamed of becoming a police officer. Morgan's dream came true Monday when the Covington Police Department named him an honorary officer. He was formally sworn in at the City Council meeting where he received an official badge, uniform as well as a key to the city.

Barron and Tangi Steward are proud parents of 5-year-old Morgan Steward, who always dreamed of becoming a police officer. Morgan's dream came true Monday when the Covington Police Department named him an honorary officer. He was formally sworn in at the City Council meeting where he received an official badge, uniform as well as a key to the city.

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Covington Mayor Ronnie Johnston swore in Morgan Steward, 5, as an honorary police officer at the City Council meeting on Monday. (Staff Photo: Jessicah Peters)

COVINGTON — One 5-year-old’s dream came true during the Covington City Council meeting on Monday.

Morgan Steward always aspired to be a police officer and Covington Police Chief Stacey Cotton helped make it happen by naming him an honorary officer.

Steward was diagnosed with spinal muscular atrophy when he was just 15 months old. His mother, Tangi Foreman Steward, said it’s the No. 1 genetic disorder that takes the lives of children.

But Morgan’s condition doesn’t stop him from wanting to serve and protect.

“Since he’s been able to talk he’s always wanted to be a police officer,” Tangi said. “He wants to arrest the bad guys.”

The Police Department gathered to show support for Morgan’s ambition at the council meeting where he was formally sworn in as an officer.

As Morgan raised his right hand, Mayor Ronnie Johnston read the oath, which included the responsibility of obeying his parents.

“The oath of office is the most important experience a police officer goes through to start a career in law enforcement,” Cotton said. “I thought Morgan and his family needed to experience that and also that the community needed to see Morgan experience it.”

Cotton gave him an official badge, uniform and even a toy gun, handcuffs and baton to fight crime. Morgan was also given a key to the city from Johnston and the council.

Now as an official officer, he will ride in the police car and lead the Christmas parade on Saturday.

Morgan’s father, Barron Steward, said it’s a beautiful thing to see Morgan wearing a police uniform.

“He just loves law enforcement,” Barron said. “Of course every kid wants to be a superhero, but because of his condition I think it’s just a security thing for him to be around police officers. He picks up on good and bad … and he hates bad acts. So it’s interesting to watch. He’s an awesome kid and we look forward to seeing his growth in his dreams.”