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Newton ACT averages still below state, nation

COVINGTON — Newton County high school students on average still are performing below the state and nation on college entrance exams.

Results from the 2013 ACT exam show that the 564 students who took the ACT, or the American College Test, had an average of 18.5 as a composite score. In Georgia, the average score was 20.7, and nationally, it was 20.9, according to results recently released by NCSS.

The ACT is a curriculum-based achievement test designed to measure college readiness and preparation. The ACT includes four separate exams in English, reading, mathematics and science. There is also an optional writing portion. The exam is scored on a scale from 0 to 36.

Across the state, 48,505 students took the test, up from more than 47,000 students last year.

Locally, 32 less students took the test compared to last year, and nationally, nearly 1.8 million students took the test, up from about 1.7 million last year.

At Alcovy High School, 184 students took the test. In English, test takers scored an average of 17.5 in both English and math, an 18.8 in reading and an 18.4 in science.

At Eastside High, 152 students tested, scoring an average of 19.7 in English, 19.1 in math, 21 in reading and 20 in science. While all were county highs, they still lagged behind state averages slightly.

At Newton High, 227 students scored an average of 16.9 in English, 17.2 in math and a 17.9 in both reading and science.

Newton County School System officials reported that overall scores dropped slightly across the board compared to last year’s results. Alcovy posted gains in reading and science.

“We are pleased with the improvements experienced by Alcovy High School,” said NCSS Superintendent Samantha Fuhrey in a press release. “As a district, however, there is work to be done if we are to improve the college-readiness of all of our test-takers as measured by the ACT. The move to the Common Core Georgia Performance Standards and the increased rigor associated with the State’s new assessments will enable us to effect improvement over time.”

Comments

John 11 months ago

"Effecting improvement over time" does not really help todays high school students some will graduate next year that are about to graduate. This comment reminds me of an old Four Tops song "It's The Same Old Song" and that is what the last NCSS super said but at least the pay check didn't bounce.

Just my opinion to get the most out of the 180 day school year simply cut out the "year around approach to the school year those 9 day breaks (two weekends and M-F) is a deterrent to the students learning ability - no doubt teachers have to spend a few extra days when the student come back reviewing what was covered the week before the break - a waste of class room time. Additionally, starting a school year in early August in the Deep South is not the best idea - those typically warm & muggy rides on those school buses are not a good way to start out the mornings and even hotter going home. Students (and the rest of us) learn more as they are more alert when it is cooler (this year is atypical). Plus, it doesn't teach students what to expect in life after high school whether it is going to college or in to the job market. My final comment it is a total inconvience to those with the youngest students and provides way too much idle and unsupervised time for those where both parents work, especially if the have a drivers license - idle hands is the devils work shop - so I was taught. The only benefit for these breaks are for teachers & admin folks - but they chose their careers.

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tomgahunter 11 months ago

Just remember that 2 of our school board members voted to hire a superintendent from a school syatem with lower test scores than ours,that's correct 40% of our school board against improving our schools.

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CBSfinder 11 months ago

What role models are there for these kids in the central office? Almost all of the school board based on the videos I have watched cannot speak proper English. Do you really expect ACT scores to be good?

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deathtotaxes 11 months ago

Why not have the school board menbers take the test.

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Tatersalad 11 months ago

So thousands upon thousands of dollars of dan mulligan workshops and three years of the oh great PhD and we are below the state and nation. Now that is a bad return on investment and SAT scores are out next month. Get your teachers off the darn Twitter accounts and back to teaching people!

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