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Faye's Angels makes the burden a little lighter for cancer patients

Michelle Donaldson, left, and her granddaughter, 5-year-old Summer Jacques, tie the ends on a lap blanket that was made for a cancer patient. In the foreground is Theresa Robinson, Donaldson's sister, who has been knitting for at least 45 years. These ladies are part of a group that meets the last Tuesday of each month at Square Perk in Covington and make hats, blankets and more for cancer patients. When they have a good number of projects completed they take them to area cancer treatment centers and hospitals to be distributed to patients. -- Staff Photo: Sue Ann Kuhn-Smith

Michelle Donaldson, left, and her granddaughter, 5-year-old Summer Jacques, tie the ends on a lap blanket that was made for a cancer patient. In the foreground is Theresa Robinson, Donaldson's sister, who has been knitting for at least 45 years. These ladies are part of a group that meets the last Tuesday of each month at Square Perk in Covington and make hats, blankets and more for cancer patients. When they have a good number of projects completed they take them to area cancer treatment centers and hospitals to be distributed to patients. -- Staff Photo: Sue Ann Kuhn-Smith

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Detail of some of the hats made

COVINGTON -- Sometimes it's the little things that mean the most. Theresa Robinson of Covington hasn't found the cure for cancer, but she's found a way to make those who have cancer feel a little better.

She's the founder of Faye's Angels, a group of ladies who pour their hearts into creating hats, blankets and other needlework projects for cancer patients.

"My aunt Faye Huckaby passed away from cancer in May 2011. She was an 18-year survivor," Robinson recalled. "When she was admitted to the hospital, she didn't want to wear a wig and asked for hats to be brought to her. The doctors and nurses who came into her room would make a big scene over her hats ... seeing her light up over the hat made me think, 'This hat brings so much joy to her. I want to be able to bring that joy to somebody else.'"

Mrs. Huckaby had gotten her original hat from Robinson's coworker at Oxford College, Jen Patil, whose mother, Donna Underwood, is an avid crocheter. Huckaby had requested something to cover her head at night when she took her wig off and Underwood had whipped up a couple of spring-like hats with flowers and a bunny on them.

After her aunt's death, Robinson went to Underwood and asked for a crochet lesson and began making hats herself. From there, friends and family passed the word along and now Faye's Angels, named in honor of Huckaby, has between eight and 10 members who create items for cancer patients.

The group meets the last Tuesday of each month at Square Perk Cafe on the Covington Square from 6 to 8 p.m.

"We'd love for anyone to join us. You don't have to crochet," she said, adding that some ladies who don't crochet make fleece lap blankets.

And she said that anyone who has surplus yarn to get rid of can donate it to the group and it will quickly be put to good use.

"We have donated several things to the Health Boutique at Newton General and to Dr. Carter's office in Conyers, Atlanta Cancer Care," she said. "And any time we see anybody in need or hear of someone in need, we send a hat or a blanket, whatever the situation is."

And the good work is spreading. Recently some of Robinson's relatives in Rabun County heard about what they were doing and decided to form a club of their own.

"They thought it was a neat idea and they have started Rabun's Angels up there," Robinson said.

For more information about Faye's Angels, call 770-605-3572.