0

Bush says he gets 'great news' after knee issue

Miami Dolphins running back Reggie Bush holds his leg after being injured during the first half of an NFL football game against the New York Jets, Sunday, Sept. 23, 2012, in Miami. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)

Miami Dolphins running back Reggie Bush holds his leg after being injured during the first half of an NFL football game against the New York Jets, Sunday, Sept. 23, 2012, in Miami. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)

DAVIE, Fla. -- Reggie Bush sent out a tweet saying he had good news, and privately told teammates he expects to be fine.

Even on the day after a loss, there was some relief for the Miami Dolphins.

Tests performed on Bush's left knee showed no serious injury Monday, meaning the Dolphins (1-2) may have their top offensive player available this weekend when they travel to face unbeaten Arizona (3-0). His last carry came just before halftime of Miami's 23-20 overtime loss against the New York Jets on Sunday, when he limped off the field and clearly was in pain.

"He's healthy and he'll be able to contribute," offensive lineman Richie Incognito said.

Bush, who has 302 yards already this season, was getting rehabilitation and not in the locker room for the portion of Monday open to reporters. Hs lone public comment came on Twitter, where Bush wrote, "Received some great news today! Praise the Lord!"

Bush got hurt on a first-down carry from the Miami 20 with about a half-minute left until halftime, a situation where some teams would consider kneeling to run out the clock.

So it wasn't just Bush's knee that was evaluated on Monday. Dolphins coach Joe Philbin said he would also evaluate the thinking behind calling a run play there, especially when the percentages of Miami adding to what was then a 10-3 lead before the half expired would seem, at best, minute.

"Right, wrong or indifferent, you certainly could argue we made some mistakes -- or I made some mistakes, I should clarify that," Philbin said. "You know, every situation's unique. You have to argue as a coach, do you have faith in your players to execute a base play in your offense and run the ball, or do you want to take a knee? I sometimes struggle with that.

"We'll have to examine it," Philbin added. "We'll take a look at it, we'll discuss it, but I don't know if there's any hard, fast (rule)."

Philbin said a number of variables -- score, time-out situations and momentum among them -- goes into the decision into whether or not the time is right for a team to kneel on the football and run out time in the half.

"Every situation is unique," Philbin said. "That's the great thing, the fun thing about game management."