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Isaac is a reminder to update disaster supply kit

Standing water in roadways can be a danger to motorists who should slow down when roadways are wet or it is raining. This photo was snapped on Main Street in Olde Town Conyers. - Staff photo by Sue Ann Kuhn-Smith .

Standing water in roadways can be a danger to motorists who should slow down when roadways are wet or it is raining. This photo was snapped on Main Street in Olde Town Conyers. - Staff photo by Sue Ann Kuhn-Smith .

CONYERS -- Newton and Rockdale counties have begun to feel the effects of Hurricane Isaac with heavy rains from the outer bands of the hurricane which carry the possibility of even more rainfall, flooding and gusty winds.

Throughout this week, forecasters expect to see rain moving into the area, with the possibility of dangerous storms.

"Now is an excellent time to review your severe weather plans," said Sheriff Jeff Wigington, director of the Conyers-Rockdale Emergency Management Agency.

"Take time to check your storm kit for necessary items, including food, water, flashlights with batteries, and medical and hygiene supplies. Make sure everyone in your family or business knows what to do if severe weather hits."

A disaster supply kit should also include emergency tools and special items for infants, elderly, or disabled family members. Those in low-lying or flood-prone areas should pack supplies in waterproof containers.

Other ideas for storm kits can be found at www.ready.ga.gov. Application software for mobile devices is also available at this site for access to information quickly.

Additional storm preparedness steps include making sure that weather radios have working batteries, and ensuring that insurance policies and other contacts are kept in a safe area.

Deputy Director Jody Nolan of Newton County Emergency/Risk Management said he doesn't foresee a widespread flood event from this storm.

"The rivers and streams in the area are below full pool, plus the volume in the Alcovy, South and Yellow rivers are well below normal so we don't expect any flooding," Nolan said. "We could get a significant amount of rain, enough to have pooling in the roadways."

He said the Yellow River, which has caused problems for both Rockdale and Newton counties in the recent past, is now at about 2 feet and it would need to reach 11 feet before there would be a concern for minimum flooding.

"It's going to have to come up 9 feet before there is even minor concern," he said, adding that he can't imagine that we'd get that much rain. "We've been in a drought situation for a long time."

Nolan said citizens can visit www.weather.gov and the Georgia Emergency Management web sites for up-to-date information, as we are entering the hurricane season and should expect that Georgia will get backlash from storms well into the fall.

"People should use this as a precursor for potential storms and the need for readiness that could occur at any time," he said.

Citizen Features Editor Karen Rohr contributed to this story.