0

Piedmont students visit Atlanta History Center

Piedmont Academy students recently took a field trip to the Atlanta History Center. Pictured are eighth-graders from Covington, Christopher Cain and Ethan Davidson, with one of two known surviving Civil War cargo and supply wagons. - Special Photo

Piedmont Academy students recently took a field trip to the Atlanta History Center. Pictured are eighth-graders from Covington, Christopher Cain and Ethan Davidson, with one of two known surviving Civil War cargo and supply wagons. - Special Photo

ATLANTA --Eighth grade American history teacher, Elizabeth Davis, and her students traveled to Buckhead to tour the Atlanta History Center.

The students had spent several weeks in the classroom studying the unit on the Civil War.

At the history center, the students saw exhibits including "War in Our Backyards: Discovering Atlanta, 1861-1865."

The exhibit challenged the students to consider their personal connections to a war that was literally fought in all of their backyards. They observed how much of the city of Atlanta went up in flames and precisely plotted locations using dozens of period sources, seven key eyewitness accounts and the exhibition's interactive map.

They viewed the Textiles and Social History Collection, an intimate record of the daily lives of Atlanta residents, from the city's founding to the present day. Among its 10,000 objects are clothing, accessories, household textiles and other personal objects.

They also saw the Civil War and Military Collection, comprised of 12,000 historical artifacts, of which more than 90 percent date from the American Civil War.

The students also saw how the Decorative Arts and Material Culture Collection documented changing lifestyles in Atlanta and the Southeast with more than 7,000 artifacts on display from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, including furniture, fine art, glasswork, and games.

After leaving the museum, the students enjoyed touring the Smith Family Farm, which includes the Tullie Smith House, a plantation-plain house built in the 1840s by the Robert Smith family.

Costumed interpreters lead the tour of the house and performed activities typical of 19th-century rural Georgia during special programs. Farm animals living on the farm include chickens, sheep and goats.