0

Bootcamp workout program wants to help you shape up

Be the Change Fitness clients workout at Eastview Park in Conyers.

Be the Change Fitness clients workout at Eastview Park in Conyers.

photo

Casey Robuck, left, and Christie Hurst lead fitness bootcamp workout sessions through their new business, Be the Change Fitness.

At a recent workout session, fitness instructor Casey Robuck approached a middle-aged woman, out of breath from all the exercise, to find out if she was OK. Her answer surprised Robuck.

"I said, 'Are you discouraged?,' and she said, 'No, I'm writing you a check,'" said Robuck of the woman who had just taken a free class to see if she wanted to sign up for more.

It's clients like her who assure Robuck and her business partner Christie Hurst that they're on the right track with their new fitness endeavor, Be the Change Fitness.

Robuck and Hurst started the business a few months ago and it offers bootcamp-type group workouts at Eastview Park on Eastview Road in Olde Town Conyers.

Clients bring their own mats/towels and 3- to 8-pound weights. Robuck and Hurst supply the exercises.

"We do everything from sprinting to jumping jacks to crunches to lunges with weights, everything from cardio to fat burning to weight training," Robuck said. "We like to mix it up with our workouts and do a lot of ... full body workouts, core strengthening and focus on endurance and strength training."

Robuck said a fitness bootcamp that she led last summer with a group of friends from her Bible study class inspired her to start Be the Change Fitness. She didn't charge for the group workouts, but her friends told her she should.

"We realized how much fun they were, and how well we got results," Robuck said.

A former teacher at Pine Street Elementary School, Robuck left her job to devote herself full-time to Be the Change Fitness. Hurst works as a head bank teller at United Community Bank in Covington.

Both women graduated from Rockdale County High School, where they participated in sports, and have remained friends and workout partners.

To generate interest in Be the Change Fitness, Robuck and Hurst offered four weeks of free workout sessions in March. Robuck said the endurance, drive and attitude of the participants, all women, impressed her.

For example, at the beginning of the sessions, some women held the "plank" position, in which a person is stretched out parallel to the floor on his elbows and tips of the toes to strengthen the abdominal muscles, for only 30 seconds. After the four weeks, they progressed to holding it one minute.

"Most of all, Christy and I are very motivating and encouraging. We've had people get great results, so that's really good," Robuck said.

In April, Robuck and Hurst began charging for the program, which runs from 5:45 to 6:45 p.m. Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays at Eastview Park. Cost is $100 for 12 sessions.

Robuck said the class has 10 students ranging in age from their 20s to 50s, and modifications are offered for all exercises to accommodate different abilities. Participants can opt to be weighed and measured to track progress.

"One of the things I love about it is that this is a small group, so it feels like a personal trainer experience but you have a great community with you," Robuck said.

To learn more, visit www.btcfit.com, email casey@btcfit.com or christie@btcfit.com, or call Casey Robuck at 770-639-9703.