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Covington mayor visits Newton County Theme School students

Staff Photos: Erin Evans Newton County Theme School at Ficquett second-graders, from left, Riley Poynter, Jackson Smith and Elijah Merricks thanked Covington Mayor Kim Carter after she spoke to their class on Wednesday morning, ironically in the same classroom where she attended first grade at Ficquett. The school invited Carter to speak to students, who have been studying government this year.

Staff Photos: Erin Evans Newton County Theme School at Ficquett second-graders, from left, Riley Poynter, Jackson Smith and Elijah Merricks thanked Covington Mayor Kim Carter after she spoke to their class on Wednesday morning, ironically in the same classroom where she attended first grade at Ficquett. The school invited Carter to speak to students, who have been studying government this year.

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Carter told students about her life as mayor and answered their questions for about 15 minutes. She told them how she helps make decisions for the city, meets with business leaders and enjoys spending time with her husband Maurice and dog Princess.

COVINGTON -- Students at the Newton County Theme School at Ficquett had a special visitor on Wednesday. Covington Mayor Kim Carter visited with second-grade students to tell them more about government.

"In following the guidelines for the Georgia Performance Standards, government is a big unit that we study in second grade," said second-grade teacher Brandi Hodges. "Since NCTS has moved to the Ficquett building in town, we thought, why not take advantage of the fact that our city mayor is just down the street."

The second-graders have learned about state and local government this year and even drew pictures of the mayor and city hall in anticipation of her visit.

"Inviting Mayor Carter to speak to us allows the students to make a real life connection to the outside world, thus making learning more meaningful to them," Hodges said. "The students have been very excited about Mayor Carter's visit, calling her a celebrity."

Carter said she enjoys visiting with students to teach them more about the city, her life and the role of a mayor.

"This is one of the best parts of my job," she said. "I'll go anywhere to talk to students. They are our future."

She told the students that one day they may even grow up to be mayor or a governor of a state or president of the United States.

Students gathered in two groups to hear from the mayor and ask her questions, such as how long she has worked at Covington City Hall, what was her first job and if she still has to pay taxes and her bills, which of course she does.

"I do like anyone else," the mayor said. "I don't get any special treatment as mayor."

The students said they enjoyed her visit.

"Thank you for taking care of my city," one of them said to her before she left.