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Fans flock to Dragon*Con

A hapless bystander is caught in the clutches of a pair of creatures recognizable from the "Alien" quadrilogy of films.  Elaborate costumes like these are common at Dragon*Con.  Staff Photo: Lee Depkin

A hapless bystander is caught in the clutches of a pair of creatures recognizable from the "Alien" quadrilogy of films. Elaborate costumes like these are common at Dragon*Con. Staff Photo: Lee Depkin

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Two-year-old Jareth Kenobi Antonelli from Upper Township, New Jersey, makes the aquaintance of an R2-X2 droid, built over a four-year period by a member of the R2-D2 Builders Club. This droid is a sophisticated working model with all the chirps and whistles familiar to movie-goers and moves by remote control. The R2-D2 Builders Club was founded in 1999 and is an Internet fan-based club with over 5000 members worldwide. Staff Photo: Lee Depkin

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Atlanta Police Officer G. Denkins, a 19-year veteran, directs creature traffic safely across Peachtree Center Avenue, between the Hyatt Atlanta and the Marriott Marquis Hotel. Staff Photo: Lee Depkin

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Lea Thompson, who had a role in the "Back To The Future" trilogy, signs a publicity photo for a fan. Staff Photo: Lee Depkin

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Could Superman have been a more effective crime fighter if he had a light saber? In the vendor area, this display of Jedi weapons was very popular. Staff Photo: Lee Depkin

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The Star Wars Stormtroopers were in abundance during the Dragon*Con parade. Staff Photo: Lee Depkin

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Chewbacca, everyone's favorite Wookiee, from the Star Wars films was a big hit with the parade watchers. Staff Photo: Lee Depkin

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Robert Englund, best known for his portrayal of the fictional serial killer "Freddy Kreuger" in the Nightmare on Elm Street series, clowns around after signing a tee shirt for a fan. Staff Photo: Lee Depkin

There was no shortage of spectacle at the 25th annual Dragon*Con convention held over the Labor Day holiday in five downtown Atlanta hotels. Citizen photographer Lee Depkin spent two days at the event, which featured exhibits, panels, seminars and workshops related to science fiction and fantasy. "It's basically a huge costume party," said Depkin.