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VMMS picks up Japanese earthquake

Last week's 8.9 earthquake off the coast of Honshu, Japan was recorded by the seismometer at Veterans Memorial Middle School in Covington. 

The earthquake struck at 5:46 UTC (Universal Time) and its seismic waves reached VMMS approximately 12 minutes later, according to the 
seismometer. A few years ago Kathryn L. Henderson, a Quest science 
teacher at VMMS, received an AS-1 seismometer (seismograph) from the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology. Instead of recording the seismic waves on a rotating drum of paper as many seismographs do, the AS-1 sends its signal electronically to a computer.

Last week's 8.9 earthquake off the coast of Honshu, Japan was recorded by the seismometer at Veterans Memorial Middle School in Covington. The earthquake struck at 5:46 UTC (Universal Time) and its seismic waves reached VMMS approximately 12 minutes later, according to the seismometer. A few years ago Kathryn L. Henderson, a Quest science teacher at VMMS, received an AS-1 seismometer (seismograph) from the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology. Instead of recording the seismic waves on a rotating drum of paper as many seismographs do, the AS-1 sends its signal electronically to a computer.

Last week's 8.9 earthquake off the coast of Honshu, Japan was recorded by the seismometer at Veterans Memorial Middle School in Covington.

The earthquake struck at 5:46 UTC (Universal Time) and its seismic waves reached VMMS approximately 12 minutes later, according to the

seismometer. A few years ago Kathryn L. Henderson, a Quest science

teacher at VMMS, received an AS-1 seismometer (seismograph) from the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology. Instead of recording the seismic waves on a rotating drum of paper as many seismographs do, the AS-1 sends its signal electronically to a computer.