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Holt pays for driveway clearing

Photo by Kristen Ralph

Photo by Kristen Ralph

COVINGTON -- State Rep. Doug Holt, R-Social Circle, has paid for the cost of county public works to clear his driveway during the recent ice storm.

The bill totaled $278.80 for an hour and a half of work on Monday, Jan. 10, that entailed spreading sand and moving two vehicles so Holt could exit his driveway.

Holt notified the Citizen on Friday the bill had been paid. He produced a copy of the check with a notation by Chairman Kathy Morgan stating the bill was paid in full.

According to an invoice supplied by Morgan, Holt was billed $157.50 for five crew members who worked one and a half hours at $21 per hour; $43.50 for two pick-up trucks at a cost of $14.50 per hour; $49.50 for one dump truck at a rate of $33 per hour; $10.50 for two bags of calcium chloride; and $14.60 for a half ton of M10 sand. The invoice was generated on Tuesday, approved by Morgan on Wednesday, issued to Holt on Thursday and paid in full by Friday.

Holt previously said he was panicked he could not get his vehicles out of his driveway to participate in the General Assembly session. At that time, the session was under way and was expected to take place the following day as well. Gov. Nathan Deal later canceled the Jan. 11 session that Holt was concerned about reaching.

Holt called Newton County Board of Commissioners Chairman Kathy Morgan and asked for a list of contractors who could help him get out of his driveway by Tuesday. At that point, Morgan said she offered the assistance of the county public works crew. A crew was already in the area and Morgan said she instructed them to finish their work on roadways and bridges before heading to Holt's house. Morgan said she and Holt discussed the appropriateness of the situation, and he agreed to the assistance only if he could fully reimburse the county.

Morgan said the TV news media were reporting that the Georgia State Patrol was giving legislators rides to the Capitol, and she thought the least the county government could do was help Holt out of his driveway.

Holt, who lives in east Newton, called the Citizen to explain the situation and apologize after an anonymous tipster called an Atlanta TV station.

"I thought we would be in session the next day, and I let myself get too anxious," he said at the time. "I let myself make an error in judgment, and I apologize for it."